Continuing with the ME109G

Hi everyone,

I’m back now : ) The unexpected break in production was due to a change in employment (a much less stressful one!) and family commitments.

So I’ve made good headway with the ME109G Gustav as you can see.  I just want to put some mastic on the parts I’ve painted by hand and get some airbrushing done of the underside.  Here are some pics for you all:

Front shot of ME109
Front view of ME109

I’m really impressed at the build quality of this kit from Airfix, just hoping I can do a good job of it!

This is a first for me doing a WWII German fighter, but I couldn’t resist the urge!

Take care everyone, I promise it won’t take me as long to write my next blog.

Wayne

AceAircrafts

 

 

A bit of extra info about the ME109

Hi guys!

So instead of just doing my usual thing and blogging about building the planes, I thought it might be to interesting to talk about the plane I was actually building – if that makes sense!!

This gives me extra time to prepare for the following week and avoid getting into a flap at the weekend – Oh no I haven’t built anything!! I’m sorry if a blog with limited pictures and building bores you, so please tell me what you think….?

So the ME 109 was one of the most advanced fighters of the era giving the Spitfire and (especially) the Hurricane a run for their money in the Battle of Britain. It includes features such as an all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. It was powered by a liquid-cooled, inverted-V12 aero engine. However, from the end of 1941, the Bf 109 was steadily being supplemented by the superior Focke-Wulf Fw 190 which I may include in future blogs. Of course as the Battle of Britain continued the allies were advancing the technology of their planes and the German Luftwaffe needed to keep up, so the Bf109G “Gustav” was introduced with a top speed of 387mph at 22,967 feet which enabled it to attack the Hurricanes from above.

The armament was also improved and could include an optional bomb on the centreline pylon and underwing cannons and rockets.

This variant gave the ME109 a hefty punch in air-to-air combat.

So there is some extra info guys I hope you enjoyed it, next week I’m hoping to do some building!

Oh, my featured image is courtesy of vqwarbirds.com thank you!!

Take care everyone and thank you for visiting AceAircrafts!

Wayne

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Unpacking the ME109

Hey everyone!!  I’m so excited about my new site and feel I can totally focus on building, and of course writing about the planes I build.

So I figured I’d try something a little different this time and also needed to create myself some slack so I could have a go at practising some airbrushing in time for finishing the BBMF collection with the Lancaster ( I’m certainly NOT going to try and paint that by hand!!)  I’m also trying to moved my blogs to a more specific blog site I’ve created in wordpress, and here it is!!

So let’s have a look at the ME109, sworn enemy of the Spitfire and Hurricane in the summer of 1940!!!

This set didn’t actually come with any paints so I’ve had to go get some from Hobbycraft.

Here is the set:

 

 

 

The underneath of the plane looks as if it’s a sort of grey colour, I tried to the get the paint which corresponds to the code on the box and ‘apparently’ it is unavailable!  Not to worry I’ll make this colour myself, I can mix paints right!!

So, next week, I’ll probably be having a practice at Airbrushing on some old bits of wood I have in the garage in preparation for building the Lancaster further down the line……………….